Why NBA Teams Sign Players They Don’t Want
May 8th, 2014

[Originally posted on Hoopsworld, 29th October 2013.] The vast majority of players signed for training camp are signed to contracts without any guaranteed compensation on them. This, certainly, is no surprise, as it has long been known that most players signed for training camp are not expected to make the team. A few players have fairly nominal guaranteed portions – for example, Dee Bost received $50,000 from Portland, Dewayne Dedmon $25,000 from Golden State, and Trent Lockett $35,000 from Sacramento. Most, however, do not. Teams are not involved in bidding wars for the Trey McKinney-Jones and Carlos Morais types, and thus there is no incentive to give any guaranteed money away. Not all unguaranteed contracts are the same, however. Some utilize a contract provision called Exhibit 9. Unless you’re an agent, it is a little known device of potentially huge importance. Exhibit 9 of the Uniform Player Contract is applicable only to those summer contracts fully unguaranteed and for only one season in length. Its purpose is to reduce a team’s liability in event of injury to a player it intended to sign only for training camp. It states thusly: if the player is injured as a direct result of playing for the team and, accordingly, would have been entitled but for this Exhibit 9 to compensation, the team’s sole liability shall be to pay the Player $6,000 upon termination of the Player’s Contract. The operator ‘sole liability’ is vital here. Without an Exhibit 9, the Uniform Player Contract normally calls for teams to pay any ‘reasonable hospitalization and medical expenses’ for players injured whilst directly participating in team activity, whilst also guaranteeing the payment of their compensation, however unguaranteed it was, until such time as they are fit to return to play, up to a maximum of the end […]

Posted by at 7:43 PM

2010 Summer League Rosters: Detroit Pistons
July 18th, 2010

Patrick Christopher Christopher is a streak shooter out of Cal who doesn’t do a whole lot else. If he’s hot, he can score 30; if he’s not, he can go 3-15. Regardless of whether he’s making them, he takes them, which could be interpreted as a good or a bad thing. He’s athletic and strong, but he doesn’t do much with them other than take jumpshots. Had he done so, he might have gotten drafted. Austin Daye In spite of the disappointment of the Pistons season, Daye didn’t play over 1,000 minutes. This is partly because he didn’t do very well, particularly defensively. Daye can block shots, but he’s too thin to do much else on defense, and his effort there wasn’t particularly good either. He was better offensively, but made quite a lot of rookie mistakes and didn’t show a dribble-drive game, taking only jumpshots and dunks that other people set up for him. This will be fine in the long run, but only if he ups his tree point percentage from 30%. And puts on weight. A lot of weight. Jordan Eglseder Eglseder is a freshly graduated senior from Northern Iowa who made his legacy by owning Cole Aldrich in NI’s upset win over Kansas in the NCAA tournament. He was a good player before then, averaging 11.9 points and 7.2 rebounds on the season in only 21 minutes, but that was the game that made his legacy. Eglseder really has nothing in his favour other than that game, his 7 foot 280lbs frame, and his turnaround jumpshot. But as Aldrich will testify, it’s a hard shot to stop. Marquez Haynes 6’3 scoring guard Haynes averaged 22.6 points, 4.3 rebounds and 3.7 assists per game for Texas-Arlington last year, but had an assist/turnover ratio of only 1:1. He […]

Posted by at 12:15 PM