Nazr Mohammed and Trade Kickers
December 4th, 2012

Even though he signed a one year minimum salary contract using the Minimum Salary Exception, Nazr Mohammed has a 15% trade kicker in his current contract. Trade kickers in contracts are somewhat rare. They are particularly rare in small contracts, as becomes obvious upon a study of the current trade kickers in the league today: Ray Allen – 15% – $3,090,000 Andrea Bargnani – 5% – $10,000,000 Nic Batum – 15% – $10,825,000 Chris Bosh – 15% – $17,545,000 Jose Calderon – 10% – $10,561,982 Vince Carter – 10% – $3,090,000 Tyson Chandler – lesser of 8% or $500,000 – $13,604,188 Pau Gasol – 15% – $19,000,000 Manu Ginobili – 5% – $14,107,492 Eric Gordon – 15% – $13,668,750 Blake Griffin – 15% – trade kicker is in his extension, beginning next year Udonis Haslem – 15% – $4,060,000 Roy Hibbert – 15% – $13,668,750 LeBron James – 15% – $17,545,000 Amir Johnson – 5% – $6,000,000 DeAndre Jordan – 15% – $10,532,977 Brook Lopez – 15% – $13,668,750 Robin Lopez – 15% – $4,899,293 Shawn Marion – 15% – $8,646,364 O.J. Mayo – 15% – $4,020,000 Mike Miller – 15% – $5,800,000 Nazr Mohammed – 15% – $1,352,181 (cap number of $854,389) Steve Nash – 15% – $8,900,000 Derrick Rose – 15% – $16,402,500 Josh Smith – 15% – $13,200,000 Jason Terry – 7.5% – $5,000,000 Jason Thompson – 5% – $5,250,000 Anderson Varejao – 5% – $8,368,182 Dwyane Wade – 15% – $17,182,000 Deron Williams – 15% – $17,177,795 Metta World Peace – 15% – $7,258,960 Furthermore, many of those trade kickers are in contracts that are already paying the maximum salary to the relevant player. As kickers cannot be used to increase a salary to an amount greater than the max, those kickers are thus pretty much […]

Posted by at 12:38 PM

Zach Randolph may or may not be about to get a pay rise
July 19th, 2012

In April 2011, Zach Randolph received a four year, $66 million extension that will pay him through the 2015 season. Notwithstanding the very valid arguments that a man who doesn’t have any athleticism in the first place is going to decline slower than most, and that Memphis have to pay particularly big dollars in order to retain quality their quality players, it is unmistakably a big contract. The contract called for a $15.2 million salary in 2011/12, a $16.5 million salary in 2012/13, a $17.8 million salary in 2013/14, and a $16.5 million salary in 2014/15, which is also a player option year. The vast majority of contracts around the league increase in their every year, yet, aside from a couple of particular instances (contracts signed with either rookie scale exception or the minimum salary exception), this doesn’t have to be the case. Contracts can go up, down, stay flat, or some combination thereof, as freely as the signing parties so choose and if done in accordance with the acceptable parameters. (The maximum increase percentages are the same as the maximum decrease percentages.) Zach’s contract structure makes sense. The Grizzlies, clearly, are trying to reconcile their hefty salary bill in the coming few seasons with the fact that Zach’s play will decline towards the back end of the deal, facts that the staggered contract structure seeks to partially alleviate. However, in doing so, they seem to have accidentally violated a CBA rule. It is important to express at this point that Randolph’s 2014/15 contract is officially listed as a player option year, and not an early termination option. It is often expressed that the two are by and large the same – including repeatedly by this website – and they are. They are both seasons within a contract that only […]

Posted by at 2:07 AM