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Tuesday, April 19, 2011

Where Are They Now, 2011: Bookkeeping The Retired Guys

A lot of "where are they now" posts on other websites tend to deal mainly in answering a different question altogether; namely, "what did these players used to do?" Since it is assumed that that is known by anyone seeking to ask the original question - else it wouldn't have been asked - such matters are not dealt with on this website. Instead, we deal with the question that was actually asked; where are these players now?


Tariq Abdul-Wahad - Abdul Wahad part-owns France's first black TV channel, Telesud.


Shareef Abdur-Rahim - Reef was an assistant coach with the Kings for two seasons, before being moved up to assistant general manager this season. By proxy, if not by choice, he has a role in the Kings's uncertain future.


Cory Alexander - Last time we checked in on Alexander, he was working as an announcer for Virginia games. He still is, but not entirely by design. That link is to a very lengthy breakdown of Alexander's post-retirement life; long story short, he's lost all his money, and he's suing Bank of America for it back.

Friday, April 15, 2011

An Unnecessarily Exhaustive Guide To The Eurocup Final Four

The NBA playoffs are basically upon us, and with the brackets now determined, it's high time to get some betting done. If you don't pick a Bulls/Spurs finals, you're a brave man.

However, the onset of these playoffs is far from the only thing happening in basketball right now. After all, this is the crescendo of may league's seasons, not just the NBA's. This is particularly true in the cases of the intercontinental European leagues; the Euroleague, which has already been covered, and the Eurocup, which is about to be.

Continuing a series of posts that take fleeting glances at every worthwhile current player in the world today - the loose theme of which is 'Why spend all that time watching it all just to never write about any of it?' - there follows a look at the compelling protagonists of the final four teams in this Eurocup season. Teams list in no order other than alphabetical.

Tuesday, April 12, 2011

Rockets sign Marqus Blakely to a multi-year contract

The Houston Rockets exited the trade deadline with a full roster, but the subsequent buyout of Jared Jeffries opened up the 15th spot. Houston initially used this flexibility to sign multi-time Rocket Mike Harris to a 10 day contract, and later opted to offer him a second one when the first one expired last week. However, they will not sign him for the remainder of the season.

Instead, with the spot opening up upon the expiration of Harris's contract yesterday, the Rockets have used it to call up Marqus Blakely from the Iowa Energy of the D-League.

Blakely, a combo forward from Vermont, began the season with the L.A. Clippers, with whom he had also played in summer league. He appeared in two preseason games with the team, and upon being waived, he went to the D-league, assigned to the Bakersfield Jam. Once there, Blakely averaged 13.0 points, 6.1 rebounds, 1.7 steals and 0.6 blocks, before being traded by the Jam in late January to the Iowa Energy in exchange for a 2011 first round pick. With the Energy, Blakely has averaged 17.2 points, 6.6 rebounds, 1.2 steals and 1.0 blocks per game, shooting 70% from the floor. His 15 points, 13 rebounds and 2 blocks in 28 minutes led the Energy to victory in their first playoff game last week, a 103-96 win over the Utah Flash.

Blakely's contract with the Rockets will run for the remainder of the season and through 2013, as does the contract of Marcus Cousin, signed by the Rockets yesterday. Additionally, as was not the case with Cousin, Blakely has not been assigned to Houston's self-owned D-League affiliate, the Rio Grande Valley Vipers. Yet.

Saturday, April 02, 2011

An Unnecessarily Exhaustive Guide To The NBA Prospects Of The Unsigned NBA Draft Picks

If your team drafts a player, and yet never signs him, the chances are that they'll still own his draft rights.

The presence of those draft rights means that that player can sign only with the right-holding NBA team, and not with any others. Such draft rights can also be traded, either to a recipient team who values the player and thus gives something of value for them, or as arbitrary filler obliging the NBA's rule that all partners in a trade must trade something outbound, however menial. In theory, there exists multiple uses for these draft rights.

In practice, however, they are often of no use whatsoever. They exist as technicalities, relevant only on a whimsical level, interesting only to the insanely boring. Luckily, I am such a person.

A longer breakdown of the usage of otherwise redundant rights in trades can be found if you scroll down here (a link also containing a much shorter-handed version of this list). An incredibly long breakdown of the whereabouts of the players concerned follows this amusing picture of Ronnie Brewer.

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"The brain behind ShamSports could have been featured in a number of these Twitter lists, but because his website often spends our entire working day lodged in one of our browser tabs we decided to take the boring route and place Mark amongst the professors. Deeks might be the funniest man you've never met, he does exhaustive work with the NBA's salary minutiae and transaction follow-ups, and he's a stone-cold must-follow. Stone-cold fox, too, ladies. Or, some gentlemen."