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Friday, July 30, 2010

The best of what's left

Shaq and LeBron in a twat-off

The international basketball market is incredibly dry right now, and there's a lot more produce than buyers. The whole nation of Greece is broke, and Spanish clubs are running into financial barriers they're not normally known for. Even Italian teams, including four time defending champion Montepaschi Siena, are facing budget cuts.

In the NBA, most of the big stuff has been done. Of the 280 or so rotation spots in the league, most have been filled, and rosters in general are starting to fill up. That said, there's still a lot of players out there looking for work, ranging from the meh to the intriguing. This excessively long list attempts to chronicle them all.

The following is written with an eye on NBA signings; however, these players are of course open to the world at large. Hardened readers will note that a lot of these blurbs are jacked from other places where I have written them before.....but, you know, whatever.

Monday, July 26, 2010

A History Of Failed Physicals

The following post will features as many Head puns as I can think of, with varying degrees of subtlety.

Earlier this month, free agent Indiana Pacers guard Luther Head came to terms with the New Orleans Hornets on a two year contract. A mere couple of days after this news was reported came the news that Head's job offer was gone; he had failed his physical examination with the team, and that the signing had been called off. Head is now available for everyone.

Controversy surrounded the decision. Head's agent, Mark Bartelstein, slammed the Hornets's decision. Bartelstein claimed there was ulterior motives behind the veto, and that the Hornets had claimed Head had failed the physical just to get out of the signing, when in actuality they'd just had a re-think. Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports took that angle further, calling the decision a "slimy trick", and loudly calling out Hornets executive Hugh Weber.

That said, there's always controversy when a player fails a physical. In all the time I have been following the NBA, the team trading away the player - or, in Head's case, the free agent's agent - have cited some kind of failure of the due diligence on the part of the recipient team as being the only reason for the vetoing of the transaction. On a case-by-case basis, that may be entirely correct; for all I know, the Hornets DID do what Barts and Woj suggest, and veto the deal on flimsy grounds because they'd simply changed their minds. Or maybe the Hornets were genuine about their claims on Head's health. I don't know. It's not my place to know. And I don't really want to know.

But what it did stir within me was a desire to investigate failed physicals over the years, and what they actually represent. If someone fails a physical because a team sees a possible long-term health problem down the road, how accurate have those assessments been? Armed with the benefit of hindsight, I was intrigued to find out.

There follows a list of all failed physicals in the NBA since the advent of the 1993-94 season; as the very least, it's as accurate of a list as I could compile. If any failed physicals in that time span have been overlooked, let me know.

Saturday, July 24, 2010

2010 KBL Draft Results


The South Korean basketball league (KBL) is an interesting one. Much like the Chinese Basketball Association, it is interesting for three main reasons;

1) It's full of import players that you've heard of,

2) The domestic players' talent level is pretty bad,

3) The import players' talent level is pretty good.

This leads to huge statistics from players that you've heard of. And that can never be bad.

The KBL employs a draft process for its import players that is better described here. Also at that link is the list of 165 players who registered for the KBL's draft pool; it is from that list that the drafted players were chosen. That listed was whittled down from 224 to 165, and it is reproduced below for no real reason.

Ex-NBA player Charles Shackleford arrested for selling prescription medication

Per a million places, but arbitrarily taken from ENCToday.com, former NBA big man Charles Shackleford has been arrested in an undercover drug operation that saw him trying to sell 150 pills to the rozzers.

Charles Shackleford is in trouble with the law for the second time in six months.

Shackleford, a former Kinston High School, NCSU and NBA basketball player, was arrested by the Lenoir County Sheriff’s Office on Thursday after he allegedly sold 150 prescription pills to an undercover officer.

The incident took place in the vicinity of Fairgrounds Road and N.C. 11/55 in Kinston. The 6-foot, 11-inch Shackleford was transported, processed and taken before a Lenoir County magistrate, who ordered the 44-year-old to be held in the Lenoir County Jail under a $30,000 secured bond.

Shackleford’s first court appearance is scheduled for Monday morning.

The article goes on to describe an arrest of Shackleford's from earlier thus year, in a bizarre care involving identity theft and ex-NBA player Jayson Williams. Before that, Shackle was arrested in 2006 for drug and weapon possession, pleading guilty to the weapons charge in exchange for the drugs charges being dropped. His retirement from basketball has not gone well.

Nonetheless, Shackleford is perhaps most known for a quote that is a mainstay in the ShamSports.com quote archive:

"Left hand, right hand, it doesn't matter. I'm amphibious."

Lorenzen Wright has gone missing

Per this story from George Brown of WREG.com, former NBA big man Lorenzen Wright has gone missing.

The family of Lorenzen Wright says he's been missing since Sunday.

Wright's sister, Savia Archie, says her family is very concerned.

Archie said, Wright was last seen on sunday when he was expected to fly out of Memphis, but no one has heard from him since.

The family has filed a missing persons with the Collierville police department.

Sunday, July 18, 2010

2010 Summer League Rosters: Detroit Pistons

Patrick Christopher

Christopher is a streak shooter out of Cal who doesn't do a whole lot else. If he's hot, he can score 30; if he's not, he can go 3-15. Regardless of whether he's making them, he takes them, which could be interpreted as a good or a bad thing. He's athletic and strong, but he doesn't do much with them other than take jumpshots. Had he done so, he might have gotten drafted.

Saturday, July 17, 2010

2010 Summer League Rosters: Cleveland Cavaliers

Jerome Dyson

There was a time when averaging 20/5/5 at UConn meant a guarantee to be drafted. Not so for Dyson. For all the scoring numbers, Dyson is far from a complete scorer; for all the assist numbers, Dyson is far from a point guard. And at 6'3, he'll struggle to be a shooting guard as well.

Much of his production comes from the fast break, where he is unbelievably good. He can snake his way to the basket with blistering speed, and finish with athleticism despite his small size. In the half court, however, he can't get to the basket as readily. This is due in no small part to his jumpshot, which doesn't really exist. And while Dyson has the athletic tools for perimeter defense, he lapses.

If he goes to the D-League - and he should, because he's going to be on the cusp of a call-up - then he could put up similar numbers to that. But without a jumpshot, his ridiculously tremendous upside potential is limited.

Thursday, July 15, 2010

2010 Summer League Rosters: New York Knicks

Eric Boateng

Boateng is an English centre who played one year at Duke, before transferring to Arizona State, where he just completed his senior season. He barely played at all in his first four seasons, but finally got a chance to play last year, and responded with averages of 8.8ppg and 7.2rpg on 66% shooting. However, even though he turns 25 in November, Boateng is still an incredibly raw player. He turned it over 2.1 times per game in only 27 minutes, despite not taking any dribbles at any point, and shot only 50% from the foul line. He's also not much of a shotblocker; essentially, he's a 6'10 slightly above average rebounder.

Boateng will play for the Great Britain national team this summer, but mainly others won't. Joel Freeland and Ben Gordon just dropped out this week due to injury, and earlier, Robert Archibald had also pulled out. Nick George and Andy Betts have also pulled out, leaving the team with almost no quality left on it, and its chances of qualifying for Eurobasket 2011 in tatters.

This is why Luol Deng is so unbelievably freaking important to us. He is now our everything. Anyway, I've tangented.

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

2010 Summer League Rosters: Washington Wizards

Trevor Booker

My early proclamations that Booker might be the next Paul Millsap were a bit premature, and overlooked the fact that Booker is about half the rebounder that Millsap is. Jumped the gun a bit there, I did. However, I remain confident in Booker's abilities to contribute at the NBA level, despite his lack of size for the position. Boozer is athletic enough and has improved his face-up game, both the drive and the shot. He'll have to be a small power forward, but he's strong and athletic enough to do that.

2010 Summer League Rosters: Houston Rockets

Blake Ahearn

Ahearn is the shooter from Missouri State who has played a few games for the Miami Heat. He's a rather unique little sausage; an extremely brilliant shooter from the foul line and from three point range, and who can masquerade as a point guard reasonably well, but who is unathletic and doesn't contribute much elsewhere. The most notable part of all that is the efficiency; Ahearn always shoots over 40% from three and over 90% from the line, and I do mean always.

Last year was no different. Finally leaving the D-League to go and get some proper money, Ahearn signed with ACB team Estudiantes Madrid, for whom he averaged 14.2 ppg in 24 mpg with absolutely no other statistical contributions other than fouls. He shot only 30% from two point range, but he hit his customary 41% from three, and also shot 98% from the line (57-58). When his contract expired, Ahearn returned to the D-League, where he averaged 44.5 mpg, 26.2 ppg, 6.0 apg and 4.7 rpg for the Erie BayHawks, shooting 45% from the field, 43% from three and 96% from the line.

In these posts, when I say about someone that "he's a good shooter, but not good enough of one to make the NBA" - and I've had to say it a lot - Blake Ahearn is my yardstick for that. He's about as good of a shooter as there can be, and even he can't get in. Strange times.

2010 Summer League Rosters: Minnesota Timberwolves

Mo Charlo

Charlo is a small forward formerly from Nevada who turns 27 next week. He is an athlete and defensive specialist, who has spent much of his professional career in the D-League. Last year, playing for the Reno Bighorns on account of his local ties, Charlo averaged 9.7ppg, 5.2rpg and 2.7apg. There were also a couple of near triple doubles in there, with statlines of 12/15/9 and 19/12/8, before a slow finish to the season dragged down his numbers. But for all his athleticism, Charlo struggles to score outside of the dunk. Sometimes he can slash to the basket, but there's no jumpshot there.

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

2010 Summer League Rosters: Atlanta Hawks

Alade Aminu

Aminu was covered in the Bobcats summer league round-up thing of last week. In 4 games for Charlotte, Aminu averaged 5.5 points and 4.0 rebounds. Additionally, Aminu has signed a contract to play for Chalon in France next season. So whatever chances he had of making the Hawks roster now look shot.

2010 Summer League Rosters: Milwaukee Bucks

Antoine Agudio

Of all the undersized jumpshooters in the D-League, Agudio might be the best. The cheerful looking one is the all-time scoring leader in the history of Hofstra, beating out former Bulls guard Norman Richardson when he averaged 22.7ppg in his senior season. Agudio is a 6'3 pure shooter, who last year for the Albuquerque Thunderbirds averaged 15.1ppg, 2.5rpg and 2.8apg with 44% three point shooting. He's strong, able to also create off the dribble, and tries hard defensively to overcome his height disadvantage. Yet the height disadvantage is pretty large. Jaycee Carroll has much the same profile and is a very awesome player, but it's also significant that Jaycee Carroll is not in the NBA. It would benefit Agudio to leave the D-League and go do something similar to what Jaycee is doing in Europe. He is capable.

2010 Summer League Rosters: San Antonio Spurs

DeJuan Blair

I really don't think DeJuan Blair needs to be here. Summer league is designed for players who need to prove something; those barely on a roster, those looking to make it onto one, draft picks trying to prove their worth, and also-rans looking to use the opportunity for good European gigs. But the only thing DeJuan Blair has to prove is the long term health of his knees. And unnecessary playing time is not the answer for that.

2010 Summer League Rosters: Denver Nuggets

Antonio Anderson

Anderson was previously covered in the Bobcats summer league roster round-up of last week. As it happens, however, Anderson played only 89 seconds for the Lolcats, recording nothing but a trillion. Per 48 minutes, that's still a trillion.

Monday, July 12, 2010

2010 Summer League Rosters: Chicago Bulls

Rather than repeating myself unnecessarily, I shall instead just link to to my breakdown of the Chicago Bulls' 2010 Summer League Roster, written at ChicagoNow.com, where I front the premier Bulls blog, Bulls Confidental.

Breakdown of the Chicago Bulls' 2010 Summer League Roster

The typo of Morris Almond's name is a particular highlight.

2010 Summer League Rosters: Portland Trail Blazers

These things tend to tangent. Stick with it.

Luke Babbitt

I'm still not sure of why Portland has been trying to acquire small forwards so proactively. The Luol Deng rumour won't die, even if you want it to, and the team just signed Wesley Matthews to a full MLE contract. They also traded for Babbitt's draft rights and signed him straight away, despite already having Nicolas Batum on the roster. Batum is really good and already has a capable backup in Dante Cunningham in place; now with Babbittt as well, I don't see the need for this constant desire to get another one.

2010 Summer League Rosters: Phoenix Suns

Earl Clark

Clark's rookie year was not great, due in no small part to a lack of opportunities. He averaged only 2.7 points and 1.4 rebounds per game, shooting 37% with an 8.5 PER, and not always playing the quality defense for which he (should) be known. The departure of Amare Stoudemire should in theory have gotten him more playing time; however, the acquisitions of Hakim Warrick, Josh Childress and Hedo Turkoglu, plus the retention of Grant Hill and Jared Dudley, and the possible re-signing of Louis Amundson, seem to have snuffed that out again. Where Clark's minutes will come from next year is once again unclear.

I really, really, really, really, really, really, really, really do not like the Turkoglu acquisition.

Sunday, July 11, 2010

2010 Summer League Rosters: Los Angeles Lakers

Derrick Caracter

Caracter stayed out of trouble in his time at UTEP, and began developing into the player that he could always have been. He's lost weight, shaved his stupid hair cut, and doesn't have to worry about academic problems any more. Now, barring any petulance relapse, Caracter gets to just be a player. He's becoming a decent one, too.

2010 Summer League Rosters: Toronto Raptors

Solomon Alabi

If you read my draft recap, you'll know how I feel about the Alabi pick. I'm pretty much all for it, and believe he has a chance to be a good contributor in the NBA. At #50, I think he was a steal. Even with hepatitis.

If you haven't read my draft recap, go do so. But you might want to book a day off work in advance. It's a bit long.

2010 Summer League Rosters: Golden State Warriors

Will Blalock

Blalock's recovery from a life-threatening stroke continues, as he gets back to nearer his NBA-calibre best. He started last year with the Maine Red Claws, and was traded after 25 games to the Reno Bighorns, for whom he averaged 11.8 points and 7.4 assists per game. Blalock has battled weight problems since his stroke, but he lost weight during the D-League season and improved as the campaign went along. Blalock turns 27 in February and will probably never get back to the NBA, but his good D-League season, aided by a decent summer league performance, should see some good European gigs in the near future.

Saturday, July 10, 2010

2010 Summer League Rosters: Dallas Mavericks

Roddy Buckets

The final year of Jason Terry's contract is only partially guaranteed. Only $5 million of $10,658,000 is guaranteed; the rest becomes guaranteed dependent on how many minutes Terry plays. Terry's contract will become guaranteed if he plays in more than 60 games and more than 1,500 minutes next year; if he doesn't, and he's waived before next July 15th, then whoever owns him could get a break of a few million dollars.

I'm telling you this because Boobwar is making Terry available.

2010 Summer League Rosters: Orlando Magic

This post is a bit late, considering the Magic have played their games. However, the site's outages just before free agency started set us back a bit, and then obviously free agency itself kind of blew the cock off the whole thing. Sorry about that.

Since I'd already started it, we'll do it anyway.

Jeff Adrien

It's hard for a 6'7 power forward to make it in the NBA. You have to be pretty exceptional at something to do it. Adrien, though, is exceptional at nothing. He's solid at most things except foul shooting; decently athletic, willing and able to rebound, capable of defending the post, prepared to run, and able to shoot right handed hook shots. But despite his height, he's in absolutely no way a small forward. He's a very undersized power forward who is neither really athletic nor Chuck Hayes.

Adrien played in the LEB Gold last year, averaging 12.3ppg and 7.7rpg for Breocgan Lugo. It's a league ideally suited for him.

Changes In 2010/11 Salaries Due To Performance Incentives

The worst part about maintaining the internet's premier NBA salary information resource is that the information is never static. It is ever-changing. Due to things such as conditional guarantees, trade kickers and the like, rarely do contracts ever stay the same. This is particularly true because of the science of performance incentives.

Performance incentives can be included in contracts for almost any reason, including (but not limited to) All-Star selections, championship, or team wins. The only rules are that any numerical definitions are specific, and that they are for positive achievements only (although God knows why you'd want it otherwise). For example, Kirk Hinrich has performance incentives based on any First Team All-Defensive placements that he gets, and Matt Bonner's just-expired contract was based around his three point and free throw percentages.

These incentives are deemed by the league to be either "likely" or "unlikely". If they are deemed "likely", then they appear on a team's cap number for the upcoming season; if they are deemed "unlikely", then they are not. This is why this information is important to cap space calculations and the like. The likehood of incentives is decided by the league using one simple criterion; whether the player achieved the incentive last year or not. In the case of team-based incentives such as team win totals, this can be changed when a player is traded to a new team; this is perhaps most famously demonstrated by the case of Devean George, whose team win-based incentive went from "likely" to "unlikely" when he was traded from Dallas to Golden State, thereby costing him $200,000. Such is the risk.

Cap hits based on performance incentives are modified during the moratorium, due to a re-evaluation of their incentives. (That's what the moratorium is for - bookkeeping.) Some previously deemed "unlikely" were met, and are now deemed "likely" - some unlucky players have had the opposite happen. There follows a list of all player's salaries that have been modified for the 2010/11 season due to performance incentive changes, and by how much. Details of why these incentives have changed (i.e. what they are based on) are not listed, in part because I don't know them all.

Thursday, July 08, 2010

2010 Summer League Rosters: Charlotte Bobcats

Alexis Ajinca

After giving up a pick with very lax protection to get him - in the end, it became the one used on Luke Babbitt - Charlotte have spent two years not playing Ajinca. Jinx played 182 minutes only on his rookie season, and topped that in his sophomore season with only 30 minutes played all year. He spent a lot of the year on assignment in the D-League, averaging 14.6 points, 7.5 rebounds, 3.1 blocks, 3.0 turnovers and 3.9 fouls in 26 minutes per game, showing some signs of scoring and shotblocking ability while committing far too many mistakes and not defensive rebounding much. However, entering his third year, the D-League is now no longer an option. If Ajinca is going to do anything Theo Ratliff-ish, he's going to have to do some of it in his third year. If he doesn't, there might not be a fourth.

The amount of cap room teams will actually have, updated, again

This is an update of the update of the earlier post that detailed the amount of cap room teams will have. It is updated to reflect everything that happened at the draft, including, in the case of the Kirk Hinrich trade, things that haven't happened that soon will.

More importantly, it is updated to reflect the fact that we now know where the salary cap is going to be; with the calculations all down, the NBA has announced that the salary cap for the 2010/11 season will be higher that expected, coming in at $58,044,000.

After all that, it went up from last year.

Other than those things, this is a carbon copy of the initial post. In this edition, there are no entries for teams irrelevant to cap space, because I can't be bothered. If those teams make moves to become relevant, they will get mentioned later.

Tuesday, July 06, 2010

2010 Summer League Rosters: Philadelphia 76ers

Ryan Brooks

Ryan Brooks is a shooting guard whose nose is a different colour to the rest of his body. He just graduated from Temple, where he led the team in scoring in his senior season with 14.6 points per game. He also chipped in 4.2 rebounds and 2.3 assists per game, while turning it over only 1.2 times, an incredibly solid number. He's a solid all-around player and a quality college guard; unfortunately, there's nothing that stands out about his game. Brooks is slightly undersized, a mediocre athlete, a crafty scorer but not a standout shooter, an interested and pretty effective defender without the physical tools to be so at the next level, a man who doesn't make many mistakes but who doesn't create much either. That's a summer league calibre player, but not an NBA calibre player. Not at 6'4, at least. But he'll make some money in Europe.

2010 Summer League Rosters: Boston Celtics

Jaycee Carroll

If Jaycee Carroll was 6'6, he'd be in the NBA and Matt Carroll wouldn't. But he's not. He's 6'2, not a great athlete, and nearer to 30 than 20. So now it doesn't matter how much Carroll scores and in what league; it just won't be good enough.

Carroll is a seriously big time scorer, mainly on jumpshots and floaters. He is extremely good at both of those things, and it is not by chance that he led the Spanish ACB (the world's second best league behind only the NBA) in scoring this year at 18.8ppg. Carroll knows how to get open off the ball and can create his own shot with it, an incredibly efficient scorer even when up against world class defenses.

However, 27 year old undrafted 6'2 unathletic scoring guards do not get into the NBA. If anyone can, Carroll can. But Carroll can't.

2010 Summer League Rosters: Indiana Pacers

Paul George

The Pacers have done nothing to advance their team since the awesome 61 win team of 2003-04. In that time, their win totals have tapered off slowly; 44, 41, 35, 36, 36, 32. They make moves more befitting of a championship contender (Dahntay Jones for 4 years? Earl Watson for one? Drafting Tyler Hansbrough? Trading for Mike Dunleavy and Troy Murphy?) when they haven't the core around which to build. Apart from catching lightning in a bottle with the drafting of Danny Granger, the Pacers have done nothing to build a young foundation, nor have they done anything to build an old foundation.

George represented the Pacers highest draft pick since 1996, when they picked Erick Dampier 10th overall. Indiana normally drafts low because they're good - in the last few years, however, they've been drafting in the late lottery. They are not good enough to make the playoffs, yet their needless short term moves also ensure they are not bad enough to draft higher than that. Not since George McCloud in 1989 have the Pacers drafted in the top 10; not until next summer will they have any cap space. Without those things, the Pacers have been unable to land a star or any significant young talent, and while the #10 pick in a strong draft represented a chance to do, all Indiana have done is use it on a player who plays the same position as their best current player.

This is a re-think on my draft night stance, admittedly. Nevertheless, we're going to have to sign away one more season of moribund stalemate for the Pacers. When 2011 free agency comes around, maybe they can finally build something significant.

Monday, July 05, 2010

2010 Summer League Rosters: Oklahoma City Thunder

Cliff Hammonds

Former Clemson guard Hammonds is an unusual find on the Thunder roster, because he's already signed for next year. He spent last year in Greece with Peristeri, averaging 12.9ppg, 3.1rpg, 3.7apg, 1.5spg and 2tpps (timely paychecks per season), shooting 48% from the field and 42% from three. He even up his usually dreadful free throw percentage to a vaguely tolerable 71% (still sub-par for a point guard, but no longer sub-50%). Hammonds has signed in France to join ASVEL Villerbanne, a normally elite French team (with 18 championships in 61 season) coming off an unusually dreadful sub-.500 season. It seems strange that ASVEL would let him play here as well. Nevertheless, it's all good for Hammonds, who gets a decent chance at free exposure before beginning his decent new French gig.

Friday, July 02, 2010

2010 Summer League Rosters: New Jersey Nets

Something I had forgotten about in the Hornets summer league round-up, pointed out to me by ticktock6 of Hornets Hype.com, was that Craig Brackins and Quincy Pondexter will be joining the Hornets roster once their as-yet-uncompleted trade with the Oklahoma City Thunder goes down. This goes some way to explaining why their roster is, frankly, a bit weak.

However, a look at the upcoming Nets roster also highlights the flaws in the Hornets's lineup. New Jersey have on their team many undrafted players from this year's draft class, several of whom could easily have been second round picks. There are a couple of also-rans, of course, but with roster spots to be won, the Nets have drawn a crowd of players who can certainly win them. This is in contrast to the Hornets roster, which, apart from the NBA players on it, has few possible NBA players on it.

(If that makes sense.)

Julian Wright was intended to play on the Hornets team as well, but he opted out. Doesn't seem like a smart move for a man who needs to both win favour and improve greatly.

2010 Summer League Rosters: New Orleans Hornets

Darren Collison

Last year at this time about Darren Collison, I wrote this:

Big fan of Collison. He's like Chris Duhon except with a mid range game and the ability to recognise when to shoot. And Chris Duhon with those things added to his game would be a fine player.

Turns out he was even better than that. Duhon's career has been peppered by games in which he plays outrageously well, mired amongst weeks of mediocrity. Those are called, by me at least, "Duhon Games." Collison's rookie season was made up solely of Duhon games. It was a beautiful thing.

But don't be mistaken. Collison's awesome rookie season does not make Chris Paul available for trade. The only way Chris Paul gets traded is if Chris Paul demands it. And if the Hornets succumb to that pressure before they do everything possible to better the team - which includes, but is not limited to, getting value for that Peja Stojakovic expiring - then they should be ashamed. Darren Collison is good, but Chris Paul is an all-time calibre point guard. You don't trade all-time calibre point guards just to move Emeka Okafor.

NBA Free Agency Movement, Part 1



It's the first day of the 2010 free agent negotiation period, and already players are being overpaid. There follows news and opinions of all the signings so far.

2010 Summer League Rosters: Utah Jazz

Free agency is going on, and big names are moving all over the world. However, so are the little names. And since half of this website is devoted to the little names, there follows looks at the summer league roster for all NBA teams. These posts will be in no particular order.

Thursday, July 01, 2010

2010 Free Agency, Preliminary Round

Thank you for your patience as we resolve the issues that have plagued this website in recent days. We're on top of it now. Sort of.

The free agency season is upon us, and a lot of housekeeping had to be done before we could get going. Players with player or early termination options had to decide if they were coming back; the few players with team options awaited an uncertain future; players eligible for QO's had to see if they got them. All the results are in now, however, and there follows a list of who did what before July 1st.

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"The brain behind ShamSports could have been featured in a number of these Twitter lists, but because his website often spends our entire working day lodged in one of our browser tabs we decided to take the boring route and place Mark amongst the professors. Deeks might be the funniest man you've never met, he does exhaustive work with the NBA's salary minutiae and transaction follow-ups, and he's a stone-cold must-follow. Stone-cold fox, too, ladies. Or, some gentlemen."